The latest in a long line…

Of studies, trying to show how stupid fat people are.   This one is from Australia where they are saying, get this, that fat people don’t know that if they eat foods that are bad choices they gain weight, and if they are given counseling, they stop being fat!

I know, radical idea there.  Amirite?  I mean, we’ve only seen this, or something like this about eleventy bazillion times.  In the past year.  In the USA alone.

Besides trying to say that fat people are stupid — come on, we don’t know that eating ice cream for breakfast, second breakfast, lunch, tea, first dinner, second dinner, and before bed snack is just going to “pack on the pounds”? — they also say that fat people “find it difficult to solve problems and achieve goals.”

Pretty broad brush they are painting every. fat. person. in. the. world with there, don’t ya think?

Do some fat people have Executive Function Disorder (EFD, a disorder that is related to ADD/ADHD)?  Probably.  Do ALL fat people have EFD?  Most assuredly not.  Do some fat people have difficulties solving problems and achieving goals?  Yes.  Heck, I’d even say all people EVERYWHERE (not just fat people) will, at times, have difficulties solving problems or achieving goals.    Even so, that does not mean all fat people have this disorder, and just don’t know that eating the wrong food choices will result in weight gain.

I mean, it’s not like there is so much more to weight and size besides the calories in makes one fat model, is there?

Oh, and here’s where this gets really ridiculous.  It has been shown that people with EFD respond favorably to a certain type of counseling.  Lesley Campbell, an “obesity expert” and conjoint professor at UNSW started a trial with fat people doing this certain type of counseling, to see if they lose weight.

The trial is only 10 people.  And it’s only for a month.

I’m sure, if and when those ten people lose “4 pounds on average” during that month, the headlines will scream, “Study Proves Counseling is the Answer to Obesity” with the opening paragraph reading something along the lines of, “It seems like it’s not the typical Fatty McFatterson’s fault for being so fat after all.  It’s a disorder in their brain, and with enough counseling, they can overcome their disability…”  Of course, the final paragraph will have to include, “Just because it’s not necessarily Fatty McFatterson’s fault how his brain reacts to things, that doesn’t mean we should all go out and eat candy and chips at every meal.  Just remember, the way to avoid falling into the trap that McFatterson has fallen into is to eat bad foods in moderation, if at all!”

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9 Responses

  1. Here’s the thing. I do have severe problems with executive functioning (I’m autistic, in fact)…but that does not necessarily translate into not knowing how to feed yourself! Executive functioning problems impact different people in different ways. Some autistic people, in fact, who do have problems with that manifest it in exactly the opposite way: they don’t even know they’re hungry until they’re about to pass out. And yes, there are FAT people who have that particular manifestation of it! It also does not have anything to do with the amount of intellectual capacity or knowledge a person has.

    Also, not being able to stick to some hideous no-carb regime forever is not an indication of a “disorder.” Puh-lease.

    • “Some autistic people, in fact, who do have problems with that manifest it in exactly the opposite way: they don’t even know they’re hungry until they’re about to pass out. And yes, there are FAT people who have that particular manifestation of it!”

      I have the “don’t even know I’m hungry until I’m about to pass out” thing. In me, it has nothing to do with EFD, as it does years of conditioning my body to NOT know, to NOT listen to the signals.

      On Sunday, coming back from an extremely rough day dealing with a family emergency, Conall asked me, “Are you hungry?” He was, and wanted to stop someplace to get something to eat. My response was, “I don’t know.”

      He was completely bemused that I could not know if I was hungry or not. As I told him that night, unless I can actually hear my stomach growl at me, I don’t know if I’m hungry or not.

      And yeah, not being able to maintain a starvation diet (of whatever ilk it is) forever does not indicate one has psychological problems.

  2. What an incredibly annoying article. Yes, there really IS something that stops people from dieting effectively – it’s called hunger, and it’s backed up by a snowstorm of hormones. To overcome it in the long term, you have to develop such disordered thinking that you run a real risk of becoming anorexic.

    Everybody’s got the magic answer, don’t they? Even when they admit that dieting and so on doesn’t work, and they know the physiological reasons for why that might be they still think counselling will sort everything out. Who’s got the disordered thinking, then?

  3. You write:

    > they also say that fat people “find it difficult to solve problems and achieve goals.”

    Interestingly you omitted the word ‘often’ from the quote, which is actually

    >.. it is the opposite for obese people, who are often too flexible and find it difficult to solve problems and achieve goals.

    You then write

    > Pretty broad brush they are painting every. fat. person. in. the. world with there, don’t ya think?

    Why do you think they are referring to every fat person? Because you snipped the word ‘often’.

    And who is ‘they’? You realize you are (mis)quoting an article about the topic, not the report itself?

    • The word “often” comes before “too flexible”, and, at least in my reading of it, does not necessarily relate to “and find it difficult to solve problems and achieve goals.” Even if it does relate to that part of the sentence, my point still stands. And there is the fact that the noun “obese people” is not modified. It’s not “some obese people”, or “few obese people” or even “many obese people.” It’s “obese people”. And that’s where the modifier is actually important in this sentence. By not modifying the “obese people”, the writers are leading the readers to think ALL obese people.

      (Because I’ve been called on this once recently, is English your native language? Because if not, it can be forgiven that you don’t know about the important modifier, or lack thereof, in the sentence. If it is, than this is just a diversion trying to get me to go off on a grammar lesson, and it won’t work.)

      They (the writers of the article, of course, since “they” never even gave us a link to the original study) are leading the general public of Australia in particular and the world in general (since this is the intarwebz and anybody can get a hold of such stuff) to think that ALL fat people “are often too flexible and find it difficult to solve problems and achieve goals.”

      It’s more lying. It’s more propagation of fat bias and fat hate. I mean, it’s not like we’re not already reviled for being lazy as it is! (You know, that “difficult to achieve goals” thing there.) Because of the prejudice and stigma against mental illness that is still very prevalent in this world, saying that it’s a disorder that causes it still does not make it better. In fact, for some people who are very anti-mental illness, it makes it that much worse.

      And it doesn’t take away from my point at all. That here is another study being used to “prove” that fat people are stupid. Because, you know, “When it comes to food, the scientists believe EFD can play havoc with an obese person’s ability to plan diets and their ability to associate bad food choices with weight gain.” SCIENTISTS say this! It must be true! After all, I read it on the intarwebz!!

  4. Yeah, fat people can’t achieve goals at all. That’s why we don’t have balanced budgets, grocery lists, clean houses. clean clothes, balanced checkbooks, kids in school, doctor appointments, pets, jobs, or lives in general. We just all sit around all day long and lay around all night long waiting for someone to take care of us because we just can’t meet any of those goals on our own (/sarcasm).
    Do the people who write these articles ever pull their heads out of their asses long enough to see what goes on in the real world?

  5. This reminds me of a book I have seen reviews of but not found a copy of. The writer’s name is Steven Seabold(?). He argues that fat people have different attitudes and and feelings than thin people.
    The differences mentioned are things that I have seen to differ because of health issues, age, early conditioning, etc,etc, but not fat.

  6. i’m with you. i’m not always aware of when i’m hungry, given my own devices. this crazy dog, though, she gets very upset with me if i havent eaten in a while…hours. she starts whining and licking me.

    she’s doing her job, but…wowsers.

  7. Wait! EATING too much of the “wrong” foods makes you fat?! WHY HAS NOBODY EVER TOLD ME THIS!!??

    Or maybe they did and I was too stupid to remember…

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