Men (humans) are not mice.

No, really.  You’d think by now that researchers would understand that.

There was an article out in the Science Daily recently about how calorie restriction may not, in fact, extend people’s lives, even though it does for mice.  (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080924151018.htm)

One of the comments by the researchers was that it was “puzzling because it was the first time we hadn’t seen agreement between mice and rats on calorie restriction and humans on calorie restriction.” 

I am not a scientist, and have never claimed to be a scientist, but even I know that rats and mice aren’t humans.  No matter how good they are for laboratory testing, there is going to be differences between mice and rats, and humans.  The only way to understand humans, and how human bodies respond to things like diet, is to actually study humans on diets.   Google “Minnesota Starvation Experiment”.  That was a real study, done on real humans, with real results.

Actually, here, this is a good idea of what happens, physically and mentally: http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/135/6/1347      Just remember when you read this:  This was on a “low-calorie” diet of 1800 calories per day.  That’s not even as low as what’s considered “medically safe” now — 1200 calories per day.

So, yeah, humans aren’t mice.   Surprising, isn’t it?

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2 Responses

  1. I have to admit that the article about the MN starvation project brought a tear to my eye and not just because of what these men were willing to do to help those suffering in Europe. No I had a tear for myself too. These men were starving STARVING on 300 more calories a day than Weight Watchers gave me (and what did WW do when I lost weight? Took more calories away! ) They suffered obsessions about and cravings for food that were breaking them physically and emotionally and were lauded for the determination (which was based in their desire to help others) even though this lack of food caused some of them to need psychiatric help and others to be so caught up with food that they bought it to watch others eat it. When I have lived off of 1500 calories (something I have done so many times in my life that I don’t even really notice the hunger any more) I too become obsessed with food and lay in bed thinking of calories and portions and eventually can’t stand it anymore and give in to my urges. I ate fewer calories for longer periods of time than these starvation experiments but when I no longer could do it I am labeled as a quitter, not committed, UNHEALTHY and lazy. So I quietly shed a tear for the pschological and psychical pain I suffered that was for nothing, helped no one and will never be praised or noted. I have dieted myself all the way from a size 8 to a size 18. I have wasted years of my life living for food and a number on the scale. And now I am told that my weight is unhealthy but no one knows how to get me back to a healthy weight without using the same torturous techniques that got me here in the first place. So I just gave up. I got off the ride. Maybe being obese will affect my health, maybe it won’t. Maybe I will never be who I was. But at least I can prevent dieting and weight loss from taking more of my life away from me.

  2. Humans aren’t mice? Hell’s bells, guess I’d better do something about that tail … 😉

    (Stupid scientists.)

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